How to Find the Right Job (Part 2/3)

During the job seeking process, we have always wondered what the best way to find a good, well-paid and full-of-benefits job is. While we are at it, we will find tons of staffing agencies, thousands of job boards, millions of companies. So, how do I find the right job?

There is no right answer to that question because there are just different ways to get to the same objective, so let’s keep going and explain how each of these paths work so you can choose the right one for you.

It is now time to talk about job boards and job aggregators.

First of all, what is the difference between a job board and a job aggregator? Well, there is a slight but important difference.

A job board is a website that has an amount of job postings of their clients, that is, different companies pay different job boards to have their vacancies posted online.

On the other hand, a job aggregator is a website that looks like a job board, but it is not. A job aggregator actually takes vacancies from different job boards, companies’ websites and basically any -real- job site they can find on the web, they are a search engine, but only for jobs, that’s why they have the highest number of jobs on the web.

That could make you wonder: why do job boards continue to exist, if job aggregators have everything in one place? Because most job boards have the niche of good clients, some of them are even specialized and trusted brands. Furthermore, some job boards have candidates’ data bases, making them more appealing for companies and staffing agencies.

In terms of job aggregators and job boards, where should I look for a job? Well, that is an easy question to answer, a job aggregator will always be the best choice. They have millions of job vacancies in one place and a big advantage is they have the most popular companies and fields indexed.

If your field is less known or requires a high level of studies/experience, and you can’t find what you are looking for in the job aggregator, then you should consider a specialized job boards.

In addition, don’t forget to upload the most updated version of your résumé in the most popular job boards -the ones you trust- so you get more visibility for recruiters and companies’ hiring managers.

Finally, when it comes to job aggregators, always check neuvoo’s vacancies around the world in the link(s) below!

Your job search starts here:

ArgentinaAustralia | AustriaBahrain | Belgium | Brazil | Canada | Chile | China | Colombia | Costa Rica | Czech RepublicDenmark | Ecuador | Egypt | Finland | France | Germany | Greece | Hong Kong |  Hungary | IndiaIndonesia | Ireland | Italy | Israel | Japan | KazakhstanKuwait  | LuxembourgMalaysia | MexicoMorocco  | Netherlands | New Zealand | NigeriaNorway | Oman | Panama | Peru | Philippines | Poland | Portugal | Puerto Rico | Qatar | Romania | Russia | Saudi ArabiaSingapore | South AfricaSouth Korea | Spain | Sweden | SwitzerlandTaiwan | Thailand | Turkey | UK | Ukraine | United Arab EmiratesUruguay | USA | VenezuelaVietnam


Vanessa Romero /  neuvoo

Country Manager US/CA


6 Job Search Tips That Are So Basic People Forget Them

By Jenny Foss

The irony of job search advice: There’s so much available that you don’t have to spend more than four seconds Googling about before you land on some nugget of wisdom or another.

Yet, at the same time, there’s so much available (some of which completely contradicts other advice you’ll find) that it can easily overwhelm you. Which, in fact, is probably the exact opposite outcome you’re looking for when you go sleuthing for genuinely useful counsel in the first place.

So let’s do this: Let’s boil things down to a short list of sound, timeless job searching tips that’ll help you fine-tune your strategy so that you may sail through the process (or at least cut out some of the unnecessary time and frustration).

1. Make Yourself a “Smack-in-the-Forehead” Obvious Fit

When you apply for a job via an online application process, it’s very likely that your resume will first be screened by an applicant tracking system and then (assuming you make this first cut) move onto human eyeballs. The first human eyeballs that review your resume are often those of a lower level HR person or recruiter, who may or may not understand all of the nuances of that job for which you’re applying.

Thus, it behooves you to make it very simple for both the computer and the human to quickly connect their “Here’s what we’re looking for” to your “Here’s what you can walk through our doors and deliver.”


Study the job description and any available information you have on the position. Are you mirroring the words and phrases in the job description? Are you showcasing your strengths in the areas that seem to be of paramount importance to this role? Line it up. Line it up.

2. Don’t Limit Yourself to Online Applications

You want that job search to last and last? Well, then continue to rely solely on submitting online applications. You want to accelerate this bad boy? Don’t stop once you apply online for that position. Start finding and then endearing yourself to people working at that company of interest. Schedule informational interviews with would-be peers. Approach an internal recruiter and ask a few questions. Get on the radar of the very people who might influence you getting an interview.


By lining up with people on the inside of the companies at which you want to work, you will instantly set yourself apart. Decision makers interview people who come recommended or by way of a personal referral before they start sorting through the blob of resumes that arrives by way of the ATS.

3. Remember That Your Resume (and LinkedIn Profile) Is Not a Tattoo

Yes, your new resume is lovely. Your LinkedIn profile, breathtaking. However, if they don’t position you as a direct match for a particular role that you’re gunning for, don’t be afraid to modify wording, switch around key terms, and swap bullet points in and out. Your resume is not a tattoo, nor is your LinkedIn profile. Treat them as living, breathing documents throughout your job search (and career).


If you’re a covert job seeker, remember to turn off your activity broadcasts (within privacy and settings) when you make edits to your LinkedIn profile. If your current boss or colleagues are connected to you on LinkedIn, they may get suspicious about all the frequent changes.

4. Accept That You Will Never Bore Anyone Into Hiring You

Don’t get me wrong—you absolutely must come across as polished, articulate and professional throughout your job search. However, many people translate this into: Must. Be. Boring.

Wrong, wrong, wrong. Realize that few people get hired because they had perfect white space on their cover letters, memorized all of the “correct” interview questions or used incredibly safe, common phraseology  throughout their resumes. All of this correctness is going to make you look staged and non-genuine. Instead, give yourself permission to be both polished and endearing. Memorable, likable candidates are almost always the ones who go the distance.

5. If You’re Not on LinkedIn, You Very Nearly Don’t Exist

Considering that more than 90% of recruiters use LinkedIn as their primary search tool, this is not an understatement. If you’re a professional, you need to not only be on LinkedIn, you need to be using it to your full advantage. Don’t believe me? Think about it this way: If tomorrow morning, a recruiter logs onto LinkedIn looking for someone in your geography, with expertise in what you do, and you’re not there? Guess who they’re going to find and contact? Yes, that person’s name is “not you.”


If you figure out how to harness the power of no other social media tool for job search, figure out LinkedIn. It’s (by far) the best resource we have available today for career and job search networking, for finding people working at companies of interest, and for positioning yourself to be found by a recruiter who has a relevant job opening.

6. Thank You Matters

I once placed a candidate into an engineering role with a company that manufactures packaging equipment. He was competing head-to-head with another engineer, who had similar talents and wanted the job just as badly. My candidate sent a thoughtful non-robotic thank you note each person with whom he’d interviewed, within about two hours of leaving their offices. The other candidate sent nothing.

Guess why my candidate got the job offer? Yep, the thoughtful, non-robotic thank you notes. They sealed the deal for him, especially considering the other front-runner sent nothing.


Consider crafting, original, genuine thank you notes (one for each interviewer) the moment you get back to a computer, following the interview. The speed with which you send the notes, and the quality, will make an impact.

And finally, remember that the interviewer cares much more about what you can do for them than what you want out of the deal. Certainly, they’re going to care a bunch about what you want once you establish your worth. But during the interview, you must demonstrate why you make business sense to hire, period.

By Jenny Foss

Tips for Getting Your First Job


List Places to Apply

Create a list of places to apply. Use a variety of sources to find full- or part-time work. You can start with print and online ads, job banks, and career centers. Other options include:

Gather Your Information

Many employers will ask you to fill out an application. Be prepared to do this on the spot by bringing this information with you:

  • What days and hours you are available to work
  • How you can be reached (phone, e-mail address)
  • Names and addresses of any previous employers (include unpaid or volunteer work)
  • Dates of employment
  • Description of past duties at each previous job
  • References and their contact information
  • Copies of your resume (include it with the job application if you have one)

Apply in Person

Applying in person is often the best way to find a job. Some businesses have computers set up for you to apply onsite. You usually turn in an application and then get called later for an interview. But you could be interviewed on the spot when you turn in an application, so try to be ready.

Make a Good First Impression

Before you leave home, make sure your appearance is appropriate. Personal grooming and the way you dress can matter more than a smart interview answer. You don’t need to be in a suit. Just make sure your hair and clothes are clean and neat. Avoid:

  • Tight fitting and revealing clothes (no short skirts, low-cut shirts, tank tops, or too-tight clothing)
  • Open-toed shoes or sandals (these can be considered a job hazard)
  • Extreme hairstyles
  • Excessive makeup and perfume

Be courteous and respectful to everyone you meet. Say please and thank you. Don’t slump or chew gum. Make eye contact and project self-confidence. Remember to turn off your cell phone. Show interest in the job and the company, and a willingness to learn.

Use an Appropriate, Simple E-Mail Address

Employers don’t want to contact someone at for an interview. This type of e-mail address is considered unprofessional.

Be Persistent

As a first-time job seeker, prepare yourself to hear “no.” Don’t be discouraged by a rejection. Nobody receives a job offer for every job application that they submit. Remember to:

  • Ask to be contacted if another opening occurs.
  • Leave a copy of your resume.
  • Thank the employer for their time.

Get Experience

A little experience can go a long way. Getting some type of work experience as early as possible makes you a stronger job candidate. Experience mowing lawns or babysitting shows that you know how to keep commitments, be on time, and do quality work.

Think of Your Future Goals

Start thinking about a career that would allow you to achieve the life style you want while doing what you’re really good at. For example, if a career in education interests you, apply for work as a summer camp instructor or help in a local elementary school classroom. The more career-related experience you have, the stronger your resume will be.

Source: Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development.